Mother to Mother: Kiwi Business Launches Website for Moms to Swap Maternity Clothes

Nikki Clarke co-founded maternity clothing brand Cadenshae and has now launched a pre-loved website for the brand.

Provided

Nikki Clarke co-founded maternity clothing brand Cadenshae and has now launched a pre-loved website for the brand.

A sportswear brand for pregnant women has launched a “take back and resell” initiative to make its products more affordable and sustainable.

Cadenshae, which makes activewear for pregnant and breastfeeding women, was started by parents and personal trainers Kiwi Nikki and Adam Clarke in 2013.

They felt that new mothers should have access to the same style, quality and variety that they loved to wear before pregnancy.

The duo have now launched Relove, where customers can send their used sportswear back to Cadenshae to resell to another mother-to-be at a more affordable price.

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Nikki Clarke said it made sense for the company to create a platform where mothers can swap maternity clothes.

“A woman’s body changes rapidly and dramatically during pregnancy and postpartum, so a woman’s need for different sizes and styles of clothing also changes rapidly.

Nikki Clarke pictured in 2015 packing a Cadenshae order.  (File photo)

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Nikki Clarke pictured in 2015 packing a Cadenshae order. (File photo)

The idea for Relove had been on his mind for years, after seeing activewear being continually shared online in “buy, sell, swap” groups.

“This initiative not only means new moms get our clothes at a more affordable price, but it also saves items that end up in a landfill,” she said.

Her Casual Breastfeeding hoodie, which sells for $89.99, could be had on Relove for $35, and leggings that would normally sell for $94.99 could be had for $40.

Each item was assured it was fit for resale, and those who donated were then given store credit – from $5 to $15 depending on the style and condition of their items.

All returned items that are not fit for resale will be donated to charity.

Edwin S. Wolfe